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40% OFF standard AND VIP tickets - offer is only valid TODAY

Enter the code CLOCK40 at checkout to receive 40% OFF standard AND VIP tickets to the GIANT HEALTH EVENT. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn about truly empowering health technology and innovation! Buy your ticket here.

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Doing Business in the UK: Health Tech Zoom Webinar

Doing Business in the UK: Health Tech Zoom Webinar

Last chance to join our Zoom conversation about the U.K health tech industry and the opportunities available to New Mexico companies for collaboration, market entry including STEP grant funding! Click here to find more information.

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Wednesday 21st October - Elective & Emergency Care Improvement Support Team are supporting FabChange20

Wednesday 21st October - Elective & Emergency Care Improvement Support Team are supporting FabChange20

On Wednesday 21st October Elective & Emergency Care Improvement Support Team are supporting #FabChange20 by helping to 'Fab Up' communications this year by a dedicated special radio sign in #GB1FAB on #HamRadio

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The new digital services tax begs two big questions

The new digital services tax begs two big questions

Laurence Parry, tax partner at Kreston Reeves, on why the new digital services tax begs to very important questions. The Chancellor Philip Hammond announced in his Budget at the end of October the introduction of a new digital services tax. The tax, which will be shaped further in a consultation, will apply to search engines, social media platforms, and online marketplaces and will be levied at 2% of the turnover from those businesses that relate to UK users. The government gives the following examples of businesses that will fall into this new tax: If a social media platform generates revenues from targeting adverts at UK users, the Government will apply a 2% tax to those revenues; If a marketplace generates commission by facilitating a transaction between UK users, the Government will apply a 2% tax to those revenues; If a search engine generates revenues from displaying advertising against the result of key search terms inputted by UK users, the Government will apply a 2% tax to those revenues. This begs the first question – how will the legislation define this? The government obviously knows who it wants to target, but that is not the same as writing it into law. For example, it is intended that the provision of online content and television/broadcasting services will not be in scope. How will the government ensure that Amazon’s income is split to ensure that Amazon Marketplace is caught but Amazon Prime isn’t? The second of our questions is how will the UK government obtain access to this data, when it is by definition held outside of the UK?

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Ori Biotech To Use $30M Series A On Cell, Gene Therapy Manufacturing Platform

The London and Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey-based company is developing a platform that closes, automates and standardizes manufacturing for cell and gene therapy developers so they can move their treatments from the pre-clinical process through to scale commercially. The company…

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IBM UK’s Chief Medical Officer, Mark Davies to discuss his Point of View - Emerging Smarter: Rethinking Healthcare on Tech Data's Healthcare Ecosystem Webinar

IBM UK’s Chief Medical Officer, Mark Davies to discuss his Point of View - Emerging Smarter: Rethinking Healthcare on Tech Data's Healthcare Ecosystem Webinar

The current crisis has created a watershed moment for the NHS, demanding a reappraisal of how essential services are delivered to the public. Many industries have already made the shift to enabling collaboration and innovation through more agile models of…

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Startups Magazine: Female Founders & Women In Tech - 15th October

Startups Magazine: Female Founders & Women In Tech - 15th October

Join Startups Magazine for an afternoon of inspiration & motivation - there will be a short talks, networking, goodie bags & prizes.  This will be a VIRUTAL event, held on Zoom but with a mix of polls, interactions, goody bags…

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Ask the Investor with Jai Juneja, Head of Tech Investment from SeekVentures and Kartik Varma, Managing Director of the Barclays Accelerator powered by Techstars

Ask the Investor with Jai Juneja, Head of Tech Investment from SeekVentures and Kartik Varma, Managing Director of the Barclays Accelerator powered by Techstars

Access to investors is rare, so when you have a chance to pick the brains of some of the best in the business, you shouldn’t pass it up. Jonno Southam, who leads Venture Capital Business Development for Amazon Web Services (AWS), sat down with Kartik Varma, Managing Director of the Barclays Accelerator powered by Techstars, and Jai Juneja, Head of Tech Investments at SeekVentures, to talk about the state of the sector at the 2018 event. The investors said they saw a couple of key themes emerging among startups. First, unbundling the bank – separating functions like mortgages, current accounts, and so on – and, second, large enterprise investments, for example the technology for getting information to investors, such as startups disrupting products like the Bloomberg Terminal. Juneja said many of these startups are focused on disrupting the user experience, but plenty of companies are also applying novel technologies to fintech problems. Distributed ledger technology, such as the blockchain, is being explored in several areas, as are artificial intelligence and machine learning. Both investors said they look closely at a startup’s tech stack. “Architecture is destiny,” said Varma, explaining that early decisions can affect how the company develops and what it is able to do later. This is where cloud technology can preserve flexibility. Often, said Juneja, “our portfolio companies do due diligence” on a potential investment’s tech stack. That’s important because, as anyone who has spent any time in startups knows, new businesses frequently have to ‘pivot’ – to change their approach, as circumstances evolve. Varma said it’s always important to consider how big a pain point a company is solving – is the startup’s solution addressing a big market where the problem is deeply felt. A startup has little chance of success if it isn’t solving a customer’s problem. He said companies often consider ‘product-market fit’ – how well their product addresses the market in question, but they don’t often consider ‘founder-market fit’. In other words, why is this particular founder the right person to change this specific market? Juneja said that for early stage companies he is looking at “problem, team and market” but there’s room for change. With later-stage companies, business models are more of a concern. Asked about how his views on certain trends had changed, he said he is more skeptical of peer-to-peer lending companies than he was a few years ago. Conversely, he has been surprised by the potential of challenger banks and is now more optimistic about their potential. It isn’t just startups that change their ideas as new information comes to light. Investors do, too. Learn more about how AWS can support your fintech startup and register to be the first to hear when registrations for the 2019 AWS FS:Insight open .

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Five questions every private equity investor will ask technology businesses

Five questions every private equity investor will ask technology businesses

Raising money from private equity investors to fund growth is a well-trodden path for technology businesses, and the key to a securing the deal is preparation, says Jack Clipsham and Haodong Zhang of Kreston Reeves. Here, they share the five key questions every private equity investor will ask a technology business looking for funding. Before approaching any funder, a technology business needs to ask itself one important question: how much is it looking to raise? The answer will determine who might be interested in investing. Companies looking for smaller amounts, typically under £2m, would be best looking towards family offices, high net worth individuals and private funds. Those businesses wanting more substantial amounts are best approaching larger private equity investors with institutional backing. There are a significant number of sources of funding and it is important to pitch to the right providers in terms of both amount and sector specialism. Irrespective of the amount raised, senior management teams can expect to be asked the following five questions: Q1. What are you going to do with the funds? There are three good reasons why would-be funders ask this question. Firstly, to simply make sure the right kind of funding is being sought. Would, for example, debt funding or asset-based lending be more appropriate and less dilutive for shareholders?

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RSGB 2020 Convention – Online

RSGB 2020 Convention – Online

This year’s Convention was on online-only event and streamed live between 08.45 and 17.30 on Saturday, 10 October 2020. There are a range of presentations to enjoy—whether you’re a new or returning licensee, or someone who has enjoyed amateur radio…

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Are you ready for an unforgettable night of Virtual Reality and eye-opening experiences exclusive to the 4th International #VRAwards?

Are you ready for an unforgettable night of Virtual Reality and eye-opening experiences exclusive to the 4th International #VRAwards?

  This year our partners #AIXR are going virtual, bringing the unique VR driven ceremony to you on the 12th of November! Join the celebrations all from the comfort of your own home via desktop, phone, tablet or virtual reality.…

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SPECIAL OFFER - 20% OFF STANDARD and VIP tickets

SPECIAL OFFER - 20% OFF STANDARD and VIP tickets

20% OFF STANDARD and VIP tickets, simply use the code GIANT20 at checkout! Don’t miss out, this offer only lasts until SUNDAY!  Buy your ticket here now.

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